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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

We divided the frequently asked questions and answers into two segments: the general segment and the segment which presents the European CEGC project in detail. Slovenia is a partner in this project with the Slovenian Green Corridors project, within whose framework 26 fast charging stations for electric vehicles are going to be set up on the motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia.

HOW WOULD YOU ASSESS THE CURRENT SITUATION IN THE FIELD OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN SLOVENIA? HOW DOES SLOVENIA COMPARE TO OTHER COUNTRIES? HOW MANY ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEALERS OPERATE IN SLOVENIA? WHICH ELECTRIC CARS ARE AVAILABLE?

We assess the current situation with electric cars in Slovenia as the time of the final breakthrough. Not long ago you could not envisage the leading car dealers in Slovenia to organise advertising campaigns which would emphasise electromobility. This is the most direct and tangible proof of the today's mindset regarding electric vehicles in Slovenia. We may lag behind some countries, but we are also way ahead of some others.

When it comes to global electric vehicle producers with an organised, qualified and equipped sales and after sales network for selling and servicing electric vehicles, in Slovenia we currently have the following brands with long-term sales plans: Renault-Nissan, BMW in Volkswagen. To a lesser extent some other brands of electric vehicles are present, namely Tesla Motors and Tazzari. These are also brands of larger industrial groups which cooperate best with the Slovenian and European supply chain. As a result, electromobility has already been achieving wider macroeconomic benefits at this year's launch of mass presence. Certain brands have been present passively on the Slovenian market, but we have also noted that car lease and car rental providers have begun to include electric cars within their range. The Slovenian market is part of the wider European and global market, which means that individuals may buy their electric vehicle abroad if it is not available in the regular product range of Slovenian electric vehicle dealers. Nissan and Tesla brands are such examples.

What is more, Slovenia has taken an active role in promoting the use of electric cars by offering financial incentive grants to citizens wanting to buy an electric vehicle within the framework of the Eco Fund. They may choose between buying a new electric vehicle, rebuilding a vehicle, purchasing a rebuilt vehicle of a certain category, purchasing a new plug-in hybrid vehicle or a new electric vehicle with a range extender.

Moreover, we expect that the Slovenian state will decide to follow the example of certain European countries and encourage purchasing environmentally friendly electric vehicles by implementing corresponding tax relief/incentives.

HOW MANY FAST CHARGING STATIONS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES ARE CURRENTLY IN SLOVENIA?

Slovenia has around 110 public charging stations which are generally equipped with two plugs and enable simultaneous charging of two vehicles. If we add charging stations for electric vehicles owned by private companies, we assess that Slovenia currently has around 300 charging stations.

IN AVERAGE, HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO CHARGE AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

The time needed to charge an electric vehicle depends on several factors, but most of all on the charging power and how empty the battery is when the charging begins. At the fastest charging stations which allow single-phase DC charging, the empty battery of an average electric vehicle is charged to 80% capacity in less than half an hour. With the fast three-phase AC charging, the battery is charged within several hours, whilst with the slow single-phase AC charging it can take up to 8 hours to charge the battery. As such, this kind of charging is most suitable for home use, especially during the night (if the user has a two-part tariff) or at their workplace during working hours. Practice has shown that drivers charge their vehicles whenever they can and not just when the battery is completely empty. They would charge their cars for shorter periods than listed above to meet their needs.

HOW MANY ELECTRIC CARS ARE CURRENTLY IN SLOVENIA?

According to the statistical data on the end of the year 2015 there were around 600 registered electric vehicles (including plug-in hybrid vehicles) in Slovenia.

WHAT TYPE OF CHARGING STATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN SLOVENIA?

In Slovenia, we have fast charging stations with single-phase DC charging, faster three-phase AC charging and slower single-phase AC charging.

WHAT ARE THE COSTS OF CHARGING AND UNTIL WHEN WILL IT BE POSSIBLE TO CHARGE YOUR CAR FOR FREE?

A charging station with 22 kW and two plugs costs around EUR 4,000, but fast charging stations for electric vehicles are more expensive. The price range for fast charging stations is between EUR 25-40,000.

The costs of charging (pdf; 151 kb)

WHAT IS THE SITUATION WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES AND WHEN WILL THEIR SCOPE OF FUNCTIONING BE COMPARABLE TO VEHICLES WITH INTERNAL COMBUSTION?

That depends on customer demand and, consequently, on the launch of mass production of electric vehicles.

WHAT DOES A "FAST" CHARGING STATION MEAN AND WHY DOES IT STILL TAKE SO LONG TO CHARGE THE VEHICLE?

Empty batteries of electric vehicles with a capacity from 18 to 24 kWh charge to at least 80% capacity in a good half an hour. Electric vehicles can be charged according to all known standards for fast charging: DCA-CHAdeMO, DCC-CCS/Combo and AC.

DC charging is only possible up to the greatest power of 50 kW, whilst AC charging is possible up to the greatest power of 43 kW.

WHAT ARE THE INCENTIVES FOR BUYING AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE IN SLOVENIA?

Since 2011, Slovenia has been encouraging electromobility by offering the following financial incentive grants within the framework of the Eco Fund.

IN AVERAGE, HOW MANY KILOMETRES CAN YOU TRAVEL WITH AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE WITHOUT ADDITIONAL CHARGING?

Electric vehicles with batteries charged from electrical network are suitable for shorter distances, but especially for intercity driving, i.e. from 70 to 250 kilometres. Certain vehicles (e.g. Tesla) can drive up to 400 km.

According to the latest survey by SODO, in Slovenia people most frequently cover 51 to 150 km on business travel, whilst 83% of drivers cover 25 to 150 km (two thirds of all business travel).

WHAT ELECTRIC VEHICLES ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE IN SLOVENIA FOR PURCHASE?

When it comes to global electric vehicle producers with an organised, qualified and equipped sales and after-sales network for selling and servicing electric vehicles, in Slovenia we currently have the following brands with long-term sales plans: Renault-Nissan, BMW in Volkswagen.

WHAT IS THE AVERAGE PRICE OF A NEW ELECTRIC VEHICLE IN SLOVENIA?

The average price for purchasing a new electric vehicle in Slovenia is EUR 30,000.

In Slovenia, BMW i3 costs EUR 36,550, whilst the version with the range extender is EUR 4,650 more expensive. The prices do not include subsidies for purchasing electric vehicles.
In Slovenia, Renault sells three types of their electric cars: Renault Twizy (four-wheeled electric vehicle for two passengers), Renault Zoe (five-door supermini electric vehicle) and Renault KANGOO Z.E. (multi-purpose electric vehicle). Renault offers two versions of Twizy: Twizy 45 is a light quadricycle with engine power of 4 kW and a maximum speed of 45 km/h. Twizy 45 costs EUR 6,490, while the stronger Twizy 80 costs at least EUR 7,990. Renault Zoe is available in three versions as regards equipment – the basic Life version and the more advanced Zoe Dynamique Intens and Zoe Dynamique Zen versions. In Slovenia, the basic version costs EUR 20,490, whilst the more advanced versions cost EUR 21,990 (possible subsidy for purchasing an electric vehicle is not included). Renault KANGOO Z.E. costs from EUR 15,050 to 17,350 (excluding VAT); with the VAT included, the price is from EUR 18,361 to 21,167. None of the prices above includes possible subsidies. Volkswagen offers two electric vehicles on the Slovenian market: e-up! and the electric version of a Golf, called e-Golf. Volkswagen e-up! costs EUR 25,030, whilst the e-Golf costs EUR 37,258. Although BMW, Renault and Volkswagen are not the only brands that produce and sell electric vehicles, they are the only brands which officially sell electric vehicles in Slovenia. The Ljubljana vehicle dealer Autocommerce is a representative for the Smart Fortwo electric vehicle for two passengers. The electric Smart vehicle costs EUR 24,227, whilst the cabriolet version costs EUR 3,200 more. (Source: www.motorevija.si)

HOW DOES THE SLOVENIAN STATE SUPPORT ELECTROMOBILITY?

Since 2011, one of the most noticeable measures is the provision of financial incentive grants within the framework of the Eco Fund for purchasing electric vehicles. The state is actively setting up a supportive environment for encouraging electromobility, and currently the Slovenian section of the international network of fast charging stations for electric vehicles is being built as part of the CEGC project. An interdepartmental working group has been organised to prepare the strategy in the field of market development for setting up the corresponding infrastructure related to alternative fuels which will include objectives related to the development of electromobility. In the beginning of September 2015, we began a dialogue with the Section for Sustainable Mobility of the Centre for Sustainable Solutions, which further proves our pro-active operation in the field of electromobility and cooperation with all parties which drive the development of electromobility in Slovenia. What is more, Slovenia has taken an active role in promoting the use of electric cars by offering financial incentive grants to citizens wanting to buy an electric vehicle within the framework of the Eco Fund. They may choose between buying a new electric vehicle, rebuilding a vehicle, purchasing a rebuilt vehicle of a certain category, purchasing a new plug-in hybrid vehicle or a new electric vehicle with a range extender.

Moreover, we expect that the Slovenian state will decide to follow the example of certain European countries and encourage purchasing environmentally friendly electric vehicles by implementing corresponding tax relief/incentives.

WHAT IS THE CURRENT SITUATION IN THE FIELD OF INFRASTRUCTURE (I.E. CHARGING STATIONS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES)?

With regard to the number of electric vehicles currently in use in Slovenia and the size of the country, the coverage of charging stations for electric vehicles is good. Before launching sales of leading electric vehicle brands on the Slovenian market, experts from the parent companies carried out tests and advised Slovenian experts on how to update the charging infrastructure. Consequently, the infrastructure for the most part complies with the strictest criteria for charging the latest types of electric vehicles. In addition to being part of the CEGC network, Slovenia is also on the map of fast charging stations for Tesla electric vehicles. The existing network of 22 kW charging stations for relatively fast three-phase AC charging through the standardised plug for type 2 vehicles is also satisfactory.

WHY SHOULD INDIVIDUALS PURCHASE ELECTRIC VEHICLES? WHAT BENEFITS DO THEY BRING AND WHAT WOULD AN INCREASED NUMBER OF PURCHASED ELECTRIC VEHICLES MEAN FOR THE STATE?

There are several reasons, of course. First and foremost, this is a personal decision for an individual who wishes to drive a vehicle without CO2 emissions and without producing noise in the environment in which they live, the environment they visit or share with others. We should definitely not overlook the positive experience of driving an electric car. Personal belief, awareness and attitude towards environmental issues, climate change and problems related to energy self-sufficiency and preserving natural resources are very important in this regard. Taking into consideration the circumstances of use and the type of electric vehicle, users can already achieve financial savings by using an electric vehicle. Moreover, the latest survey by SODO has shown that, by having an electric vehicle fleet, companies can save a lot, because 83% of business travel includes driving from 51 to 150 km.

When it comes to the importance for the state, using a practical example gives the best insight into the matter.

PRACTICAL EXAMPLE:

If an electric vehicle user drives for 30,000 kilometres per year, with the average fuel consumption of 7 litres per 100 km, they use 21 GWh of energy. One litre of fuel contains 10 kWh of energy. Driving the same distance with an electric car and by taking into consideration the relatively large use of energy in everyday traffic – for example 20 kWh/100 km – the annual use of energy for mobility is only 6 GWh. As you can see, the savings are exceptional!

We must not forget that the average direct emission of CO2 for a vehicle which consumes 7l/100 km is around 180 g CO2/km. If we take into consideration the one-third share of electricity with a carbon imprint in the Slovenian network, the indirect emissions of an electric vehicle with the present level of consumption is less than 60 g CO2/km. For example, if an electric vehicle user charges their car at the charging stations of Elektro Ljubljana, which provides only electricity from renewable sources, the CO2 emission is zero. This is even more evident when the user charges their electrical car by using a solar power plant installed on the roof of their house. Therefore, electromobility is of exceptional importance for the state when it comes to achieving environmental and climate objectives, as well as objectives related to energy self-sufficiency.

WHERE CAN INDIVIDUALS GET INDEPENDENT ADVICE ON PURCHASING AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE? CAN ENERGY CONSULTANTS FROM THE ENSVET NETWORK HELP THEM WITH THIS?

By definition, energy consultants from the ENSVET network ought to provide advice on electromobility to individuals. The average Slovenian household consumes approximately 16 GWh of electrical energy for everyday living activities on an annual level and for mobility (if they drive for 30,000 km and use a car with the average fuel consumption of 7 litres per 100 km), they consume 21 GWh of energy. By substituting the classical vehicle with an electric vehicle, they would achieve energy savings in the amount which is close the energy used for everyday activities on an annual level. Yet the field of electromobility is new and truly complex.

Therefore, individual may turn for advice to clubs of electric vehicle users, for example the Slovenian Electric Vehicle Association. The Section for Sustainable Mobility of the Centre for Sustainable Solutions in BTC, Ljubljana, has proven to be exceptionally competent in providing holistic advice on electric vehicles right after it was established in June 2015. The Section includes all shareholders of electromobility in Slovenia which constitute the knowledge chain – from basic surveys, industrial competences, provision of electric vehicles, solutions for charging station infrastructure and suppliers of electrical energy, with the support of experts from the field of measurement technologies and premium components. Therefore, the Section for Sustainable Mobility of the Centre for Sustainable Solution is doing exceptional work when it comes to providing the right answers on electromobility. Its members from the scientific and academic sphere and the Slovenian industry of car parts for the global automotive industry – which holds a neutral position towards the different propulsion technologies, because they produce parts for all kinds of propulsion – ensure non-biased and neutral advice.

WHAT TRENDS DO YOU EXPECT FOR THE NEXT DECADE?

The objectives of the Slovenian state and the EU for the period between 2020 and 2030 are clear. It is all the more clear what environmental issues, climate change and problems related to energy self-sufficiency and preserving natural resources we are confronted with on the local, but also on the global level. The widest possible consensus is that achieving these objectives is only possible through decarbonisation. In Slovenia, no less than 40% of energy is used for transport. Therefore, electromobility is one of the most important, if not the most important, means for the decarbonisation of transport and, as such, also the most efficient. The direction of further development has already been set, but a lot depends on the further development of technologies, the market, price policies and geopolitical happenings. There is no way back! Yet it is clear that we will not be able to achieve these objectives by means of electrical vehicles alone. There will be increased digitalisation, intelligent transport management systems, as well as systems for communication between vehicles and infrastructure. Ensuring transport efficiency and, consequently, energy efficiency in transport, is becoming ever more complex and demanding. Electromobility is only part of this, but it provides numerous answers to the most pressing questions related to transport and quality of living, and even more so when it comes to preserving natural resources and ensuring sustainability.

WHY SHOULD AN INDIVIDUAL DECIDE TO PURCHASE AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

PRACTICAL EXAMPLE:

If an electric vehicle user drives for 30,000 kilometres per year, with the average fuel consumption of 7 litres per 100 km, they use 21 GWh of energy. One litre of fuel contains 10 kWh of energy. Driving the same distance with an electric car and by taking into consideration the relatively large use of energy in everyday traffic – for example 20 kWh/100 km – the annual use of energy for mobility is only 6 GWh. As you can see, the savings are exceptional!

We must not forget that the average direct emission of CO2 for a vehicle which consumes 7l/100 km is around 180 g CO2/km. If we take into consideration the one-third share of electricity with a carbon imprint in the Slovenian network, the indirect emission of an electric vehicle with the present level of consumption is less than 60 g CO2/km. For example, when an electric vehicle user charges their car at the charging stations of Elektro Ljubljana, which provides only electricity from renewable sources, the CO2 emission is zero. This is even more evident when the user charges their electrical car by using a solar power plant installed on the roof of their house. Therefore, electromobility is of exceptional importance for the state when it comes to achieving environmental and climate objectives, as well as objectives related to energy self-sufficiency.

WILL AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE REMAIN THE SECOND VEHICLE FOR THE FAMILY?

This will depend mostly on customer demand and, consequently, launching mass production. Nevertheless, we can already say that an electric vehicle can be an important factor for optimising costs, especially for companies whose operations require a lot of business travel.

WHAT DO AC AND DC MEAN?

AC and DC are labels for the different ways of charging electric vehicles. Basically, these are memory interfaces. An AC network can be a single-phase or a three-phase. It can use a standard plug or a plug with pilot function. The single-phase AC charging is slow (it can take up to 8 hours and is recommended for charging at home and during the night-time), whilst the three-phase AC charging is faster (the battery charges in a couple of hours). DC charging with a pilot function (which enables communication with the vehicle) enables fast charging. 

WHAT IS THE CENTRAL EUROPEAN GREEN CORRIDORS (CEGC) PROJECT?

The CEGC project is an important step towards the coordination and synchronisation of different European projects in the field of electromobility. Thus, using a network of fast charging stations for electric vehicles across Europe is no longer just a vision – it has become a reality. The studies have been emphasising increased integration of the energy system and drivers' needs, as well as the need for integration with information systems of vehicle producers, which will contribute to further improvement in the acceptance and spread of electromobility.

The CEGC is a joint project for establishing cross-border infrastructure for fast charging stations for electric vehicles, which connect Slovenia, Croatia, Austria, Slovakia and Germany. The CEGC Consortium was established following the TEN-T call for tenders in 2013. The project is funded by the European Union in the field of Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T). The partners in charge of the realisation of this project in 2015 include: VERBUND AG (as project coordinator), Bayern Innovativ, BMW, the City of Zagreb, the Government of the Republic of Slovenia and SODO d.o.o., GreenWay, Nissan, OMV, Schrack Technik, SMATRICS, Renault-Nissan, Volkswagen and ZSE.

WHAT IS THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS PROJECT?

The project follows two key European objectives: reducing dependency on petrol (decarbonisation), but most of all, mitigating how transport affects the environment. The objective of the Central European Green Corridors (CEGC) project is to establish a dense network of fast electric vehicle charging stations on the territories of Slovenia, Austria and Slovakia, with connections to Munich in Germany and Zagreb in Croatia. In addition to setting up infrastructure, it ensures interoperability and synergy between countries participating in the project. The first step will be taken to make the decision to purchase an electric vehicle easier for the drivers.

WHAT IS THE SLOVENIAN GREEN CORRIDORS PROJECT?

The Slovenian Green Corridors project will enable the development of electromobility in Slovenia, which takes place within the framework of the European project Central European Green Corridors (CEGC). The main objective of this project is to establish a dense network of fast charging stations for electric vehicles on the motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia by the end of 2015. The project has been approved and financed by the European Commission following a call for tenders in the field of Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T).

In cooperation with the Ministry of Infrastructure of the Republic of Slovenia and in accordance with the provisions of the Energy Act (EZ-1), SODO is setting up the basic public infrastructure for fast charging stations for electric vehicles on the motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia. Within the framework of the project, which has been co-financed by the European Commission, 26 fast charging stations are going to be set up to enable users of electric vehicles to charge them with 50 kW DC and also 43 kW AC. The project of setting up 26 fast charging stations on the motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia is part of the Central European Green Corridors (CEGC). In total, 115 modern fast charging stations are going to be set up on the corridors of Slovenia, Croatia, Austria, Slovakia and Germany to ensure interoperability and allow operation of a roaming system. Setting up 26 fast charging stations in the Republic of Slovenia will have been completed by the end of 2015.

IN ADDITION TO THE MINISTRY OF INFRASTRUCTURE, WHO IS THE PROJECT HOLDER FOR SETTING UP FAST CHARGING STATIONS BY SODO D.O.O.?

In accordance with the Energy Act, SODO is responsible for developing the basic public infrastructure for fast charging stations for electric vehicles on the motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia.

HOW MANY FAST CHARGING STATIONS ARE IN OPERATION?

Within the framework of the CEGC project, part of which was the Slovenian Green Corridors project, 115 fast charging stations were set up. Along the entire motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia 26 fast charging stations for electric vehicles were set up, which allow 52 electric vehicles to be charged simultaneously.

WHAT IS THE VALUE OF THE PROJECT?

The final value of project implementation and setting up 26 fast charging stations for electric vehicles on the motorway cross of the Republic of Slovenia was EUR 1,7 million, of which EUR 620,000 represented EU funding.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO CHARGE ALL TYPES OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES CURRENTLY ON THE MARKET AT THESE FAST CHARGING STATIONS?

The fast charging stations have the standard technology with AC/Type 2, DC/Combo 2, as well as the DC/CHAdeMO interface, which means they are compatible with most electric vehicles currently on the market. All charging stations represent a connectable network. This means that  with a network of fast charging stations for electric vehicles in Slovenia, Austria and Slovakia, as well as additional charging stations in Croatia and Germany, drivers and owners of electric vehicles are able to travel comfortably and without interruptions across the border.

DO YOU BELIEVE THAT SETTING UP THESE CHARGING STATIONS WILL INCREASE THE SHARE OF ELECTRIC CARS IN TRAFFIC? WHAT MECHANISMS AND MEASURES COULD BE IMPLEMENTED ON THE SLOVENIAN ROADS TO INCREASE THE SHARE OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES?

We believe that once the infrastructure for fast charging stations is set up, people will have an additional encouragement to decide to purchase an electric vehicle or rebuild their existing vehicle into an electric vehicle, especially if they receive a financial incentive grant from the Eco Fund and enjoy a tax relief.

Sufficiently high financial incentives, such as subsidies and tax amnesty for tax on motor vehicles and value added tax, are surely some of the mechanisms to increase the number of electric vehicles on the Slovenian roads. Norway is a good example, because the state uses a tax policy which reimburses users of electric cars up to half of the value of an electric car. We should add that, when it comes to purchasing electric or hybrid vehicles, in Slovenia we already have tax relief in place for investment for legal persons on corporate income tax (in accordance with the Corporate Income Tax Act).

WHAT ROLE DID DARS, PETROL AND OMV PLAY IN THE SLOVENIAN GREEN CORRIDORS PROJECT?

Dars, Petrol and OMV acted as project partners in the Slovenian Green Corridors project to ensure conditions for choosing suitable locations for setting up fast charging stations for electric vehicles.

WHAT CRITERIA WERE USED TO DETERMINE THE LOCATIONS OF THE FAST CHARGING STATIONS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES ON THE MOTORWAY CROSS IN THE REPUBLIC OF SLOVENIA?

When deciding on the locations, the following criteria were taken into account:

  • The presence of a public electricity distribution system with sufficient capacities
  • The distance between the charging stations set up at rest stations must be approximately 50 km
  • Presence of catering, tourist and other facilities
  • Conquering altitude differences on the motorway cross
  • Technical feasibility
  • Taking into consideration protective zones – areas
  • Price of land in terms of payment of easement rights
  • Ownership of land.

 WHAT OBSTACLES HAVE YOU ENCOUNTERED WHILST SETTING UP FAST CHARGING STATIONS ON THE MOTORWAY CROSS?

Delays in setting up the first fast charging stations for electric vehicles have occurred mostly due to revisions in the public tender procedure and additional coordination of procedures for obtaining rights to use the lands envisaged for setting up the fast charging stations. Nevertheless, these obstacles have been overcome and the works began within the planned deadlines for the implementation thereof.

WHERE ARE THE FAST CHARGING STATIONS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES LOCATED AROUND SLOVENIA?

The 26 fast charging stations for electric vehicles are set up at the following rest stations along the motorway cross:

  1. Radovljica south (Karavanke - Ljubljana)
  2. Radovljica north (Ljubljana - Karavanke)
  3. Voklo west (Kranj - Ljubljana)
  4. Voklo east (Ljubljana - Kranj)
  5. Grabonoš north (Lendava - Maribor)
  6. Grabonoš south (Maribor - Lendava)
  7. Dravsko polje north (Ptuj - Maribor)
  8. Dravsko polje south (Maribor - Ptuj)
  9. Dobrenje east (Maribor - Šentilj)
  10. Dobrenje west (Šentilj - Maribor)
  11. Tepanje west (Maribor - Celje)
  12. Tepanje east (Celje - Maribor)
  13. Lom west (Ljubljana - Koper)
  14. Lom east (Koper - Ljubljana)
  15. Ravbarkomanda west (Ljubljana - Koper)
  16. Ravbarkomanda east (Koper - Ljubljana)
  17. Šempas south (Nova Gorica - Ljubljana)
  18. Šempas north (Ljubljana - Nova Gorica
  19. Starine north (Krško - Novo Mesto)
  20. Starine south (Novo Mesto - Krško)
  21. Lukovica north (Maribor - Ljubljana)
  22. Lukovica south (Ljubljana - Maribor)
  23. Lopata south (Ljubljana - Maribor)
  24. Ravne (Ljubljana - Koper - Ljubljana)
  25. Grič (Čatež) (Ljubljana - Krško - Ljubljana)
  26. Barje north (Novo Mesto - Koper)

WHAT PAYMENT METHODS ARE AVAILABLE FOR THE PAYMENT OF CHARGING AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE AT THE FAST CHARGING STATIONS?

Users can pay for charging their electric vehicles by using an RFID user card for which they had concluded an agreement with the service provider operating at the charging infrastructure by SODO. Users without such concluded contractual relationship on ensuring and charging services are able to charge their vehicles by using a prepaid card which are available for purchase at all 26 locations of fast charging stations, i.e. at the points of sale of PETROL and OMV petrol stations 24/7.

WILL THE END USERS PAY HIGHER NETWORK FEE TO COVER THE COSTS OF SETTING UP THE CHARGING STATIONS?

No, the end users of the rapid charging stations for electric vehicles on the motorway cross will not pay a higher network fee, because the government of the Republic of Slovenia has recapitalised SODO d. o. o. which is 100 % state-owned.